Published in The Coast Star on July 22, 1999

Page 6, Cont. Page 44
Camp Evans Restoration Advisory Board member Fred Carl shared some good news with the Wall Township Committee on July 14.
Camp Evans, former Marconi Wireless Station, secret communications research site, has been selected as an official project of Save America’s Treasures by the White House Millennium Council.
“A hidden historic gem, a time capsule of New Jersey communications and space exploration history has been selected by the National Trust for Historic Preservation for a prestigious White House program,” reads the announcement made by Mr. Carl during the committee meeting.
“Camp Evans is an Official Project of the Save America’s Treasures, a public-private partnership between the White House Millennium Council and the National Trust for Historic Preservation dedicated to the preservation of our nation’s irreplaceable historic and cultural treasures for future generations.This selection will enable the preservation of the beautiful parklike waterfront site and its creative reuse as a hands-on interactive science-history education center. The center will inspire students and families to appreciate science and technology as a career choice,” the announcement said.
Camp Evans was selected for its extensive impact upon American history from the early days of wireless radio, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, America’s entry into the space age, the Cold War, McCarthy era to Desert Storm. Events, breakthroughs, research and devices developed at the site have connections with the World War I armistice, World War II as a secret radar laboratory which coordinated Army radar research with MIT, Bell Telephone, Harvard and other wartime laboratories.
After the war, engineers at the site electronically opened the space age, proving space communications was possible, by reflecting a radar signal off the moon. Prior to the creation of NASA, the first communications and first weather satellites were developed at the site. As a secret Cold War Army communications research facility considerable communications advances and applications were made with up until 1998.
The science-history center will enable corporations, individuals, the military, service organizations and clubs to assist K-12 science education in a location accessible to any school or family where dedicated Marconi, RCA and Army engineers advanced technology. The Information Age Learning Center, Inc. is partners with Brookdale Community College, National Broadcasters Hall of Fame, New Jersey Science Teachers Association, the IEEE History Center, Ham Radio clubs and service organizations to preserve the site and prepare the center to deliver education programs. Center volunteers are reviewing more than 100 hands-on science exhibits currently in use in other science centers to bring them to Camp Evans to inspire our children and families to learn science.
Members of the Quarter Century Wireless Association and Ocean Monmouth Amateur Radio Club participated in International Marconi Day. More than 1000 persons in over 20 countries spoke to radio operators at Camp Evans. The center took part in the third annual National Space Day. Science teachers in 7,500 schools around the nation were able to visit the web site (www.infoage.org) to learn how the Space Age was opened electronically in Wall at Camp Evans in 1946.
The center is now preparing to act as a regional education center for the NASA Mars Mission, Red Rover. Students who are successful in this nationwide competition will get to remotely operate the Mars explorer during the 2001 mission.
The Information Age Learning Center and partners are preparing kick-off plans to begin renovations of the center and celebrate the 100th anniversary of Marconi’s first visit to America in October 1999. The efforts at Camp Evans hold the promise of positive impact upon New Jersey education and the historic preservation of New Jersey’s electronic heritage.
Anyone interested in learning more about this consortia and its plans for the center, or making donations to help save New Jersey’s electronic heritage, can write to: Information Age Learning Center, 2201 Marconi Road, Wall, NJ 07719.

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